Tag Archives: additive manufacturing

New report: Mass customisation governance

We’re pleased to be able to share the final project report from the feasibility study led by Dr Phoebe Li at University of Sussex. “Mass customisation governance: regulation, liability, and intellectual property of re-distributed manufacturing in 3D bioprinting” describes results of their work undertaken during the 2016 round of 3DP-RDM feasibility studies. The results of this project were presented at the 3DP-RDM event 3D Printing Where and How on 31st January 2017 at the IfM in Cambridge.

Abstract

Phoebe Li, Alex Faulkner, James Griffin and Nick Medcalf

The feasibility study assesses the impacts of existing legal regimes on re-distributed manufacturing (RDM) in 3D printing (3DP). It investigates the viability of an embedded watermarking system into mass customisation governance of RDM as part of the potential impact of the three most important regimes on 3DP – regulation, liability, and intellectual property (IP) – in order to secure safety, quality control, surveillance, and traceability.

Download the report

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Event: Going for Gold: 3D Printing, Jewellery and the Future of Intellectual Property

Date: Friday 24 March 2017

Time: 10.00am – 5pm

Venue: EB708, Executive Business Centre, Bournemouth University

Register here

Additive Manufacturing or 3D printing as it is more commonly known, continues to push the boundaries of Intellectual Property (IP) law whilst raising questions relating to the protection and exploitation of IP.

This challenge, which extends to the lucrative jewellery sectorraises further questions in relation to creativity, design, copyright and licensing.

This event, which builds on the UK Intellectual Property Office (UKIPO) Commissioned Study on 3D Printing and IP law, led by Bournemouth University (BU) during 2013-2014 (reports published in 2015), will explore some of these questions by bringing together experts from the cultural and business sectors including designers, manufacturers, distributors, policy makers and legal professionals.

The event will also provide the platform for a discussion of the ‘Going for Gold’ project carried out by researchers at CIPPM (Bournemouth University) in collaboration with Museotechniki Ltd and Uformia AS.

This multi-disciplinary event will be complemented by an exhibition of 3D printed jewellery artefacts which will be on display at the event.

Register here

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Event: Identifying and Developing Additive Manufacturing Skills for UK Industry

31st March 2017,  10:00 – 16:00

The Manufacturing Technology Centre, Coventry (directions here)

Register your place

Investment in education and training leading to the provision of the right skillsets at the right time will be key if UK industry is to capture the opportunities afforded by the adoption of Additive Manufacturing technologies.

This event aims to bring together those with insight into how Additive Manufacturing technologies will develop and can be most effectively deployed by industry in order to advise Additive Manufacturing UK of the nature of future skills needs. Outputs of this event will be used to inform recommendations for action and will support ongoing work with the UK Government and wider stakeholders. The aim is to ensure that the implementation of the UK Industrial Strategy delivers the skills necessary for the on-going success of the many sectors now adopting Additive Manufacturing within the broader changes being realised through the diffusion of Digital Manufacturing.

The conference will cover topics ranging from how to increase general awareness of the practicalities of adopting Additive Manufacturing, through to the development of specific skills and competences in design and manufacturing for both new entrants to the workforce as well as those already in work. Participants will include organisations wanting to develop the Additive Manufacturing skills and competences of their current and future workforce, as well as organisation providing Additive Manufacturing awareness raising and training courses at all levels. We anticipate that the event will lead to a better and more inclusive understanding of the changes necessary to the education and skills of current occupations as well as potential new roles, and understanding of the timing and scale of such changes in demand.

Register your place here.

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New report: Driving Innovation in redistributed manufacturing

The final project report from the feasibility study led by Dr Paolo Aversa at Cass Business School and Dr Sebastiano Massaro at Warwick Business School is now online. “Driving Innovation in redistributed manufacturing: A feasibility study in the motorsport industry” describes results of their work undertaken during 2016. The results of this project were presented at the 3DP-RDM event 3D Printing Where and How on 31st January 2017 at the IfM in Cambridge. More information about their project can be found on their project website.

Executive summary

Paolo Aversa and Sebastiano Massaro

This feasibility study investigates the level of adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) technology in the British motorsport industry and to what extent this is being employed for competitive advantage. The themes of redistributive manufacturing and technological innovation are explored to understand how, and to what extent, the British motorsport industry has aligned itself to AM technology. AM has been described in recent media as a panacea, a solution for all manufacturing problems, disrupting conventional manufacturing techniques with its potential to create geometrically complex products in any location.

Investigating these themes involved collecting primary data through (1) a quantitative survey of manufacturing companies involved in British motorsport, and (2) a series of qualitative interviews with experts in the field.

Where the main benefits of AM revolved around the production of structurally complex parts and reduction in production lead time, findings from the survey reveal that AM does not fully satisfy production needs. In combination with the need to recruit additional skilled labour, results suggest that the benefits of employing AM do not currently outweigh the overall costs. On the behavioural side we found that those managers and executives who are more keen in adapting AM are overall higher in risk-taking.

Our interviewees perceive that AM technology will continue to proliferate through the British (and Italian) motorsport supply chain, supplanting conventional techniques for the manufacture of low-volume and complex parts. The close proximity of specialist manufacturers to race-teams in the British motorsport valley® cluster is perceived to prohibit any notable redistributive manufacturing but has demanded agility from those suppliers in response to the reduced development cycles that AM facilitates. As innovations in materials, processes and hardware continue to overcome challenges with reliability, integrity and cost of AM products, a new generation of university graduates are expected to be educated in the true value of AM, designing for use and championing the technology as a viable and crucial augmentation to existing conventional manufacturing techniques.

In summary, the benefits of AM processes are ingrained throughout the motorsport supply chain which has adapted, rather than re-configured, to accept these advanced techniques. The future of AM will be secured by innovations that remove physical limitations, giving way to an industry that will benefit from a hybridisation between conventional and AM technologies.

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New report: Supporting SMEs in creating value through 3D printing re-distributed manufacturing

The final project report from the feasibility study led by Dr Peter Dorrington at PDR, Cardiff Metropolitan University is now online. “Supporting SMEs in creating value through 3D printing re-distributed manufacturing” describes results of the work undertaken at PDR during 2016. The results of this project will be presented at the 3DP-RDM event 3D Printing Where and How on 31st January 2017 at the IfM in Cambridge.

Executive summary

Peter Dorrington

The aim of this report is to present a feasibility study which investigates the key challenges faced by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to create value through 3D printing-enabled re-distributed manufacturing (3DP-RDM). The key challenges that are investigated in this study include:

  1. The lack of support tools that enable SMEs to see the impact of a 3DP-RDM
    business model;
  2. The lack of design support tools for both 3DP and RDM;
  3. Primary knowledge gaps on 3D printing processes in SMEs;
  4. The gap in understanding and developing an appropriate skills-base within an organisation.

Data was collected through interviews, workshops and surveys with SMEs operating at a range of engagement levels on the 3DP-RDM spectrum. In addition industry and academic experts in the field of 3D printing were consulted. Analysis of the data was undertaken through affinity mapping; thematic analysis; IDEF0 NPD analysis; testing of a value capturing tool; and quantitative survey analysis. The results section of this study maps out in detail the keys challenges relating to points 1 to 4 above.

Accepting the limitations of such a feasibility study, the following recommendations are made to support SMEs in creating value through 3DP-RDM:

  • Embedding 3D printing in secondary education, and tertiary education;
  • Engaging SMEs in the 3DP-RDM conversation;
  • Addressing training needs for 3DP-RDM in SMEs;
  • Furthering the research agenda for 3DP-RDM.

[Image source: PDR]