Tag Archives: IP

New report: Mass customisation governance

We’re pleased to be able to share the final project report from the feasibility study led by Dr Phoebe Li at University of Sussex. “Mass customisation governance: regulation, liability, and intellectual property of re-distributed manufacturing in 3D bioprinting” describes results of their work undertaken during the 2016 round of 3DP-RDM feasibility studies. The results of this project were presented at the 3DP-RDM event 3D Printing Where and How on 31st January 2017 at the IfM in Cambridge.

Abstract

Phoebe Li, Alex Faulkner, James Griffin and Nick Medcalf

The feasibility study assesses the impacts of existing legal regimes on re-distributed manufacturing (RDM) in 3D printing (3DP). It investigates the viability of an embedded watermarking system into mass customisation governance of RDM as part of the potential impact of the three most important regimes on 3DP – regulation, liability, and intellectual property (IP) – in order to secure safety, quality control, surveillance, and traceability.

Download the report

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Event: Going for Gold: 3D Printing, Jewellery and the Future of Intellectual Property

Date: Friday 24 March 2017

Time: 10.00am – 5pm

Venue: EB708, Executive Business Centre, Bournemouth University

Register here

Additive Manufacturing or 3D printing as it is more commonly known, continues to push the boundaries of Intellectual Property (IP) law whilst raising questions relating to the protection and exploitation of IP.

This challenge, which extends to the lucrative jewellery sectorraises further questions in relation to creativity, design, copyright and licensing.

This event, which builds on the UK Intellectual Property Office (UKIPO) Commissioned Study on 3D Printing and IP law, led by Bournemouth University (BU) during 2013-2014 (reports published in 2015), will explore some of these questions by bringing together experts from the cultural and business sectors including designers, manufacturers, distributors, policy makers and legal professionals.

The event will also provide the platform for a discussion of the ‘Going for Gold’ project carried out by researchers at CIPPM (Bournemouth University) in collaboration with Museotechniki Ltd and Uformia AS.

This multi-disciplinary event will be complemented by an exhibition of 3D printed jewellery artefacts which will be on display at the event.

Register here

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3D Printing Where and How: 3DP-RDM network event – 31st January

What: Final dissemination event of the 3DP-RDM network
Where: IfM, Cambridge
When: 31st January 2017
How: Register your participation on Eventbrite

Following the completion of the second round of 3DP-RDM feasibility studies you are warmly invited to join this dissemination event to hear the final results of these studies. This EPSRC-funded event will feature presentations from the four 3DP-RDM feasibility studies conducted during 2016. Registration for this event is free but tickets are limited. Register your participation on Eventbrite.

Provisional Agenda

12:30  Lunch, registration and networking
13:30  Welcome and introductions
13:45  Overview of 3DP-RDM
14:00  Supporting SMEs in creating value through 3DP-RPM, Dr Peter Dorrington, Cardiff Metropolitan University
14:45  3D Printing Production Planning (3DPPP): reactive manufacturing execution driving re-distributed manufacturing, Dr Martin Baumers, University of Nottingham
15:30  Refreshments and networking
16:00  A feasibility study of mass customisation governance: regulation, liability, and intellectual property of re‐distributed manufacturing in 3D printing, Dr Phoebe Li, University of Sussex
16:45  Driving Innovation in Redistributed Manufacturing: A Comparative Study in the British and Italian Motorsport Valleys, Dr Paolo Aversa, City University, and Dr Sebastiano Massaro, University of Warwick
17:30  Summary
17:45  Close and networking

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Introducing Bit by Bit Visitor Gabriele Montelisciani

Gabriele Montelisciani has just joined the Bit by Bit project as a visitor for the next two months. In this guest post, Gabriele introduces himself and the work that he will do during his visit to Cambridge.

Gabriele
Bit by Bit visitor Gabriele Montelisciani

I’m a PhD student in Management and Industrial Engineering at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, in formal partnership with the University of Pisa. I have a Master’s degree in Management Engineering, with specialisation in the fields of Innovation and Business Processes Management. My research interests include: methods and tools for early stage innovation and creativity; collaborative design; sustainable innovation and development; Internet of Things, and business modeling and entrepreneurship.

I’m part of the team of the organizational team of the University of Pisa’s Technology Transfer program for entrepreneurship education and startups creation called PhDplus. I’m also a founding member of the organization Fablab Pisa, a member of the Pisa Living Lab, and a member of the International Review Committee of the International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation (ICE Conference).

During the two months that I’m visiting the Centre for Technology Management, I will support the “Bit by Bit” project group by investigating the evolution of additive manufacturing technologies and business models for desktop application. I’ll explore how the patent landscape is evolving in relation to open innovation initiatives.

The field of additive manufacturing has rapidly evolved in the last decade. The sector is facing a particular phenomenon whereby the concept of open innovation, carried out by the Makers movement, has arisen in opposition to the protection of innovation (patents), carried out by big players. The consequence is that the patent landscape is changing.

Low cost 3D printing devices have begun to reach individual consumers following the expiry of important patents related to the most common 3D printing technologies (i.e. fused deposition modeling technologies). This phenomenon generated an increased interest from incumbents in this market, and it is of particular interest to investigate how they are planning to protect the actual and future value in terms of intellectual property.

The research methodology I’ll employ during my investigation is based on three main steps:

  1. Analysis of patent databases and data interpretation;
  2. Crosscheck to sector experts to validate the results obtained;
  3. Final reporting.

I welcome any suggestions or comments on this research activity. Please contact me at gm512@cam.ac.uk.

Image source: http://www.ipo.gov.uk/blogs/ipofacto/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/11/topo-map.png

The Complete 3D Printing Conference

The Complete 3D Printing Conference was held on 25 March in London. Bit by Bit researcher Dominik Deradjat gives his summary of the event, which included presentations from a diverse range of perspectives.

Phil Reeves, MD and Principle Consultant at Econolyst, opened the conference with two presentations on the landscape of additive manufacturing. In his first session, he focused on the industrial manufacturing sector, providing an overview of additive manufacturing and elaborating on business drivers and technology adoption. In particular, cases and application in the medical, automotive and aeronautics sector were presented.

Then in his second session, Phil discussed the consumer 3D printing landscape, its commercial ecosystem and the dominant companies in the sector. He identified growth opportunities and limitations, offering a realistic and fact-driven evaluation of the current and future achievements in areas affected by additive manufacturing. In contrast to overenthusiastic expectations that can be encountered with the topic of 3D-printing, this presentation was refreshingly objective and grounded in reality.

Scott Dunham of Photizo Group provided a detailed overview of 3D printing vendors including financial results and a market assessment. Leading companies such as 3D Systems, Stratasys, ExOne and Voxeljet were evaluated and compared.

Cydni Tetro of 3DPLUS.Me described 3D printing strategies for merchandise and retail, elaborating on the importance and role of customisation and technical opportunities additive manufacturing offers. She stressed that the adaptation of additive manufacturing is still in an early stage and that technical issues such as colour and finishing still have to be addressed when considering implementation for merchandise.

Other presentations included Will Harvey’s case study of how IBM and Ogilvy implemented 3D printing for the real-time production of souvenir trophies at Wimbledon 2013, and product designer Assa Ashuach’s ideas for creating businesses in additive manufacturing.

Towards the end of the conference, Chris Higgins and Vann Pearce of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe gave an introduction and overview of patent issues in 3D printing. Additive manufacturing has created grey areas in IP as existing laws do not capture the novel mechanics of how objects created from data files function. Future legal disputes and regulatory changes will have to be observed to provide clarity in some legal areas.

The closing speaker Andrew Dawood, a specialist in periodontics and prosthodontics, talked about how additive manufacturing contributes to his medical practice. Specific cases in which the technology realised customised implants or allowed the physical creation of models for visualisation and preparation for surgeries underlines the importance of 3D printing and the impact that it’s having in the medical sector.

The next 3D Printshow in London will take place in September 2014, exact dates to be determined.

Image source: http://blog.sculpteo.com/2012/05/24/inspiring-3d-printed-industrial-landscapes/