Category Archives: scoping workshop

3DP-RDM Scoping Workshop 2016 – Discussion Activity 1 Outputs

In the same vein as the first scoping 3DP-RDM workshop in 2015, the 2016 scoping workshop featured two distinct discussion activities. These activities were aimed at identifying research topics for investigation during the feasibility studies that will be conducted later in the year.

The process used was the same as in 2015. For the first discussion activity this process is described in this earlier blog post.

Outputs of the prioritisation process

The following table summarises the list of 30 research topics that groups identified and the number of votes that each received during the prioritisation. Some of the topics were very similar and loosely clustered prior to voting. This similarity explains why several topics at the bottom of the list received few votes in comparison to those higher up the list.

Group Topic Votes

2

Education: 3D design skill as a new form of “literacy”

11

6

What does the ecosystem and business model look like for different sectors/products?

10

5

New design tools for AM and RDM

9

2

Design: customer-driven, design principles and guidelines for non engineers

9

6

How does cost effectiveness differ in centralised vs RDM for AM? Urgency

9

2

Product liability: standards and regulations around quality and performance. Allocate responsibility

8

1

Quality metrics: what, how, when?

7

6

Integrated CAD system, geometry/material composition/quality control/integrity/rights management

7

2

Does 3DP enhance production operation responsiveness?

6

5

Collaboration and linking with different prducers, end-users and suppliers

6

1

DRM versus legal contracts for 3DP-RDM applications

5

1

MIS for 3DP-RDM

5

3

Regulations: impact of existing regulations and those made for conventional manufacturing

5

3

Design and development framework

5

3

How does 3DP-RDM make business opportunities?

5

1

Challenge of ‘prodsumption’: co-locating making and buying/consuming

5

4

Scenarios of 3DP factories/ factory networks of the future

5

3

Distribution and control of data: how do you disseminate product model information, control it, who is responsible and holds the IP?

4

5

Resilience and risk reduction compared to conventional manufacturing: how can we redistribute manufacturing to increase residuals?

4

1

New design systems and exchange protocols

3

4

How can we engage people (customers) to use 3DP technology?

3

3

Skills and infrastructure: in an RDM scenario, what skills will be required? What does the respective CAD and software look like?

3

2

Supporting production planning systems / build configuration and scheduling

2

6

How are customised products by AM (for healthcare) regulated/controlled?

2

5

Reproducibility and reliablity: control of AM quality and reducing risk of failure

2

4

Through-life of 3D printed items and their monetisation

2

4

What is the best 3DP policy: proactive or reactive?

1

4

Tracking/tracing of IP in 3DP including counterfeiting, revenues and liability

0

6

How is quality control organised in RDM for AM?

0

5

Skills, education, standards

0

Participants and groups
Name Organisation Group
Ahmad Beltagui University of Wolverhampton, Business School

4

Alexander Pasko Bournemouth University, National Centre for Computer Animation

1

Andrew Triantaphyllou MTC

3

Bo Chen Coventry University, Manufacturing and Materials Engineering Research Centre

5

Chander Velu University of Cambridge, Institute for Manufacturing

6

Chaozong Liu University College London, Institute of Orthopaedic & Musculoskeletal Science

6

Christopher Noyce ESRC

3

Deepak Kalaskar University College London, UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine

3

Dominik Deradjat University of Cambridge, Centre for Technology Management

5

Hans Veldhuis University of Oxford

5

Jag Srai University of Cambridge, Centre for International Manufacturing

4

Josef Hazi University of Oxford, Oxford 3D Printing Society

4

Konstantinos Salonitis Cranfield University

2

Letizia Mortara University of Cambridge, Centre for Technology Management

4

Malte Ressin Brunel University

3

Martin Baumers University of Nottingham

2

Mélanie Despeisse University of Cambridge, Centre for Technology Management

2

Meurig Beynon University of Warwick, Department of Computer Science

3

Mudassar Ahmed University of Cambridge, Distributed Information and Automation Laboratory

2

Oleg Fryazinov Bournemouth University, National Centre for Computer Animation

4

Patrick Hennelly Sology Charters & University of Cambridge, Centre for International Manufacturing

5

Phill Dickens University of Nottingham

6

Serena Flammini University of Cambridge, Centre for Technology Management

6

Susan Reiblein HP Enterprise

1

Tim Minshall University of Cambridge, Centre for Technology Management

1

Valery Adzhiev Bournemouth University, National Centre for Computer Animation

6

Xiao Li University of Cambridge, Centre for Industrial Sustainability

1

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3DP-RDM Dissemination and Scoping Workshops

We will be hosting two days of 3DP-RDM workshops on 13-14th January 2016 in Cambridge to which you are warmly invited to participate. A provisional agenda for the workshops can be found here.

On the afternoon of 13th January we’ll be running a dissemination workshop featuring presentations from the four 3DP-RDM feasibility studies.

  1. Investigating the Impact of CAD Data Transfer Standards for 3DP-RDM Dr Eujin Pei, Brunel University
  2. OPTIMOS PRIME: Organising Production Technology Into MOst Responsive States – 3D PRInt Machine Enabled Networks Prof. Duncan McFarlane, University of Cambridge, and Edinburgh University
  3. The enabling role of 3DP in redistributed manufacturing: A total cost model Dr Martin Baumers, University of Nottingham, and University of Oxford
  4. Redistributing Material Supply Chains for 3D printing Prof. Matthias Holweg, University of Oxford

Following the dissemination workshop we’ll then host a dinner on the evening of 13th January in a historic Cambridge college (venue to be confirmed) at which we hope you will also join us. This will cost approximately £60 per person but a limited number of subsidised places are available at this dinner at £30 per person. These will be allocated on a first come-first served basis.

On the 14th January we will then have a scoping workshop to identify future research directions and possible feasibility study topics. The format of this workshop will follow that of the first we ran on 30th January 2015, building on the results of the feasibility studies, the results from the first scoping workshop (reported here and here), and the findings from the AM National Strategy development process.

Following the scoping workshop, proposals for feasibility studies will be invited from eligible UK-based academics. The deadline for a 2 page proposal will be 12pm on the 22nd February 2016. Following the review of the proposals received, 2-3 feasibility studies will be conducted, with each study having a budget of £35k-£65k. These studies should be completed by the end of 2016. More details on this process will be communicated at the scoping workshop.

If you are interested in participating in these workshops please get in touch with me or complete the form below and I will follow up with you.

Report from Local Nexus Launch Event

3DP-RDM is one of six re-distributed manufacturing networks currently being funded by the EPSRC and ESRC. On 23 March one of our sister networks, the Local Nexus Network, ran a launch event and scoping workshop in Oxford. During the event participants discussed the following:

  1. What are potential benefits and problems of a localised food system, and for whom?
  2. What socio-economic and biophysical conditions are needed to achieve a more localised food system?
  3. What are the opportunities and/or requirements for local energy and water to support a localised food system?
  4. What are the key technical, social, economic, policy research areas and questions relating to the local food-energy-water nexus?

A report summarising these discussions is now available online here.

[Image source]

RECODE Network Launch Event – 3rd June, London

Transforming the consumer goods industry through the use of big data and re-distributed models of manufacture poses entirely new challenges inherent to the capture, storage, analysis, visualisation and interpretation of big data. Combined with this is the cross-disciplinary requirement for radically new methods of engaging end-users, empowering customer interaction, facilitating ad-hoc supply chains, re-capturing and re-deploying valuable materials, optimising manufacturing processes, informing new user-driven design of customised goods and services, developing novel business models and implementing data-driven open innovation.

Led by Dr Fiona Charnley at Cranfield University, the EPSRC-ESRC Network in Re-Distributed Manufacturing, Consumer Goods and Big Data (RECODE) aims to engage a diverse community to explore the use of big data in the development of a re-distributed, joined up model of production for the future.

The RECODE Network Launch Event is being held on 3rd June 2015 at IDEALondon, 69 Wilson Street, Shoreditch, London EC2A 2BB. This initial event will bring together academics, practitioners, policy makers and others to introduce the network, through key note talks from Cisco, Cranfield University and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and start to develop a multi-disciplinary community, roadmap and vision for the future of UK manufacturing.

Register for the event here.

[Image source]

The Local Nexus Network: Launch Event and Scoping Workshop

The 3DP-RDM network is one of six networks being funded in 2015-16 on the theme of re-distributed manufacturing. We previously advertised the launch event of the Re-distributed Manufacturing in Healthcare Network (RiHN) on 26th March. Another of the RDM networks, the Local Nexus Network will be also be holding its launch event this month.

The theme of this network launch event and scoping workshop is “Building sustainable local nexuses of food, energy and water: from smart engineering to shared prosperity”. It will be held on Monday 23rd March 2015 from 10am – 4.30 pm at the Oxford University Centre for the Environment, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY.

The event will introduce the Local Nexus Network project to key stakeholders, gather common interests in local nexuses, initiate discussions on the key issues, and start building the community of nexus researchers and practitioners.

This network is for everyone from academia, business, governance or community groups, who is interested in rational integration between food, energy and water, by leveraging geographical proximity between physical, technical, economic, political, and societal resources.

Those wishing to participate should RSVP by Friday 13th March to: Jo Hamilton (Co-ordinator): jo.hamilton@ouce.ox.ac.uk Tel: 01865 275 856.

 
The Local Nexus Network
‘Local nexus’ refers to decentralised food, energy and water systems which interact with each other within the context of local livelihood and environment. The sustainable development of local nexuses has the potential to contribute to the shared prosperity between business and community and between human society and natural ecosystems. This calls for a combination of “smart” engineering (smaller scale technologies, integrated processes) and driving forces from businesses, communities and policy makers.

As one of the six 24-month research networks on re-distributed manufacturing (RDM) funded by the EPSRC and the ESRC, the Local Nexus Network aims to: 1) establish the state of the art of local productions of food, energy and water; 2) generate initial insights to guide researchers, businesses, policy makers and communities who are enthusiastic about exploring the potential of local nexuses, and 3) develop an evidence-based agenda for future research. A key mission of this network is to form an inclusive research and stakeholder community around the theme of local nexuses.

This network was proposed by a multidisciplinary academic team involving six UK universities. The members include Dr Aidong Yang (PI, systems integration), Dr John Ingram (Co-I, food systems) and Jo Hamilton (network co-ordinator) of University of Oxford, and theme leaders including Prof Matthew Leach (Surrey, energy), Prof David Butler and Dr Raziyeh Farmani (Exeter, water), Dr Lisa De Propris (Birmingham, business clusters and models), Dr Laura Purvis (Cardiff, supply chains) and Prof Andy Pike (Newcastle, policy and society). This academic team is supported by representative stakeholders, currently including Nestlé, Innocent, CHPA, Thames Water, Oxford City Council, Good Food Oxford, and FLAG.

Contacts
Dr Aidong Yang (Principal Investigator): aidong.yang@eng.ox.ac.uk
Dr John Ingram (Co-Investigator): john.ingram@eci.ox.ac.uk
Jo Hamilton (Co-ordinator): jo.hamilton@ouce.ox.ac.uk